• Associate Lecturer
  • Education

    • Ph.D. in English Literature and Cutlural Theory from Binghamton University (SUNY) (2010)

    Selected Publications

    Books

    • Spatial Resistance: Literary and Digital Challenges to Neoliberalism. NY: Lexington Books, 2019.

    Articles/Essays

    • Forthcoming "Robin Hood and Resistance: Spatial Foundations for Vigilante Action," English Studies.
    • “Deleuze and the Event(s)” (with François-Xavier Gleyzon) in Christian Beck & François-Xavier Gleyzon (Eds.) in Deleuze: Spaces of Change and Challenge Spec. issue of Journal for Cultural Research 20 (2016): 329-333. Print. DOI: 10.1080/14797585.2016.1264770
    • “Web of Resistance: Deleuzian Digital Space and Hacktivism.” Deleuze: Spaces of Change and Challenge in Journal for Cultural Research 20.
    • “Shaping Our (Medieval) Future Through Nomadic Insurgency: A Radical Reading of Ywain and Gawain.” Medievalia 36/37: A Special Issue on Medieval Futures

    Book Sections/Chapters

    • ForthcomingTo Blossom or le femme du futur” in Literary Spaces of Resistance: Transformative Spatiality in Literary and Political Discourse. Ed. Christian Beck.
    • Forthcoming “Introduction: Resistance, the Outside, and the Creative Act” in Literary Spaces of Resistance: Transformative Spatiality in Literary and Political Discourse. Ed. Christian Beck.
    • “The Nomadic Classroom: Using Praxis and Place to Negotiate Literary Space” in Teaching Space, Place, and Literature. Ed. Robert Tally, Jr. New York: Routledge, 2018. 23-30.

    Courses

    Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
    10974 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

    19625 ENL3451 Topics in British Literature Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM Unavailable

    Topics in British Literature: Social Divisions

    This course focuses exclusively on literature produced in the British Isles and areas affected by British colonization and trade. Through a theme of “Social Division|s” students will become familiar with the linguistic, cultural, and literary elements of British writing through various time periods and genres. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the breadth and depth of British literature from the perspective of social striation. Students will be expected to explore links between texts through class discussion and course writing assignments.

    11393 LIT3206 Place and Space in Literature Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 09:30 AM - 10:20 AM Unavailable

    This course is designed to identify and analyze various uses of space and place in both literature and society. Places and spaces, as we will see, are complex matrices of ideologies, interpellation, geography, architecture, and social planning. A single space can be the intersection of various, if not conflicting, ideas; a space that is both constructed by human subjects and constructs human subjects. Think, for example, of a classroom and how it is constructed, as well as how, in turn, the classroom constructs/determines your behavior/expectations (this will be a perennial example). For the first part of the course, we will be reading and discussing theories of place and space from a variety of perspectives (i.e., Geographically, Marxist, Gender Studies, Anarchist, etc.). At which point we will turn to literature. There are three main goals to this course: 1) To identify and critically analyze the way space is utilized in literature; 2) To identify and critically analyze the way places and spaces are constructed in our society; 3) To think critically about the places and spaces of education (all levels) and how a different structure might produce improved results within critical thinking/education. To meet the goals of the last two goals, we will be taking regular “outings” and hold class in different settings. These different settings and your experience of them while discussing literature will be the topic of your discussion posts.

    Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
    80474 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Unavailable
    No Description Available
    82120 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) M,W 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM Unavailable

    Theories of Literature will introduce you to ways of accessing texts that will open them up to more varied and challenging readings. Although the critical and theoretical approaches we will study are often complex and daunting, by the end of the semester you will be able to recognize and apply the approaches to a variety of literary and cultural texts. The theoretical background and writing skills you acquire should increase your understanding of literature, authorship, and literary analysis. Questioning the assumptions behind our ways of reading and meaning making is an activity we engage in often, and as a result, we will have dynamic class discussions that leave nothing uncontested. We will work hard not to stereotype or marginalize critical or theoretical approaches that seem "strange" or "old-fashioned" to us.

    81844 ENL3231 Restoration Literature World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    Form and Folly in the Era of Wit

    This course explores poetry, prose and drama from the Restoration period (1660-1700) in Britain. It is a survey course, which follows our textbook (Oxford UP's Restoration Literature: An Anthology) in designating five thematic sections to explore: "Politics and Nation," "Town and Country," "Literature and the Theatre," "Love and Friendship," and "Religion and Philosophy." 

    The learning outcomes for this course are 1) to introduce students to major Restoration thinkers, including John Milton, John Wilmot (the Earl of Rochester) and Aphra Behn, 2) and to think historically about Restoration literature in order to generate focused and convincing analytical arguments based on close reading of literary and non-literary texts.

    Of our major assignments, one will be creative and the other will be a scholarly, research essay.

    80701 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine the evolution of this complicated character at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how these figures work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit.

    Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
    51164 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) A Unavailable

    This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

    51470 ENL3231 Restoration Literature World Wide Web (W) B Unavailable
    No Description Available
    Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
    19597 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    Theories of Literature will introduce you to ways of accessing texts that will open them up to more varied and challenging readings. Although the critical and theoretical approaches we will study are often complex and daunting, by the end of the semester you will be able to recognize and apply the approaches to a variety of literary and cultural texts. The theoretical background and writing skills you acquire should increase your understanding of literature, authorship, and literary analysis. Questioning the assumptions behind our ways of reading and meaning making is an activity we engage in often, and as a result, we will have dynamic class discussions that leave nothing uncontested. We will work hard not to stereotype or marginalize critical or theoretical approaches that seem "strange" or "old-fashioned" to us.

    18008 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

    19609 LIT3206 Place and Space in Literature World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    This course is designed to identify and analyze various uses of space and place in both literature and society. Places and spaces, as we will see, are complex matrices of ideologies, interpellation, geography, architecture, and social planning. A single space can be the intersection of various, if not conflicting, ideas; a space that is both constructed by human subjects and constructs human subjects. Think, for example, of a classroom and how it is constructed, as well as how, in turn, the classroom constructs/determines your behavior/expectations (this will be a perennial example). For the first part of the course, we will be reading and discussing theories of place and space from a variety of perspectives (i.e., Geographically, Marxist, Gender Studies, Anarchist, etc.). At which point we will turn to literature. There are three main goals to this course: 1) To identify and critically analyze the way space is utilized in literature; 2) To identify and critically analyze the way places and spaces are constructed in our society; 3) To think critically about the places and spaces of education (all levels) and how a different structure might produce improved results within critical thinking/education. To meet the goals of the last two goals, you will be asked to investigate and interact with a variety of spaces throughout the semester. These different settings and your experience of them while discussing literature will be the topic of your discussion posts.

    Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
    90528 ENL2012 English Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    This course offers a broad survey of authors, texts, and genres from the medieval period through the late eighteenth century, covering approximately 1000 years of English literature. As a survey, this class presents particular challenges, as we seek to cover a breadth of material without sacrificing depth of understanding. A wide base of knowledge, effective communication skills, and critical thinking are integral to success in virtually every discipline, both in college and beyond, and practicing these vitally important skills lays the groundwork for success in your future as you read and ponder the works of the earliest and greatest writers in the English language. To this end, it is essential that you read the assigned texts carefully.

    89491 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine the evolution of this complicated character at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how these figures work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit.

    92697 LIT3206 Place and Space in Literature World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

    This course is designed to identify and analyze various uses of space and place in both literature and society. Places and spaces, as we will see, are complex matrices of ideologies, interpellation, geography, architecture, and social planning. A single space can be the intersection of various, if not conflicting, ideas; a space that is both constructed by human subjects and constructs human subjects. Think, for example, of a classroom and how it is constructed, as well as how, in turn, the classroom constructs/determines your behavior/expectations (this will be a perennial example). For the first part of the course, we will be reading and discussing theories of place and space from a variety of perspectives (i.e., Geographically, Marxist, Gender Studies, Anarchist, etc.). At which point we will turn to literature. There are three main goals to this course: 1) To identify and critically analyze the way space is utilized in literature; 2) To identify and critically analyze the way places and spaces are constructed in our society; 3) To think critically about the places and spaces of education (all levels) and how a different structure might produce improved results within critical thinking/education. To meet the goals of the last two goals, you will be asked to investigate and interact with a variety of spaces throughout the semester. These different settings and your experience of them while discussing literature will be the topic of your discussion posts.